10 Reasons Why Buying a Home isn’t a Wise Investment – Answers …


High Interest Payments

High Interest Payments

In some cases, you can possibly purchase your house mortgage-free. However, this doesn’t tend to happen often, and typically you have to borrow money in order to afford a home. The money owed accrues interest over time, which you have to pay. Buying a house, therefore, ends up becoming a pretty expensive undertaking.


Expensive Upkeep

Expensive Upkeep

Even if you paid the mortgage entirely, houses cost quite a bit to maintain. You need to pay monthly bills, such as utilities. Your house will also undoubtedly require repairs at some time or another, and that’s money that you will never get back. You may also want to start home improvement projects. While these improve your home’s appearance, you also end up pouring a lot of money into beautifying your residence.


Not Getting a Great Deal

Not Getting a Great Deal

When buying a home, you have to keep a lot in mind to make the best choices. According to Forbes, it helps to consider inflation, which determines how much your house’s value will increase or decrease in the coming years. Inflation doesn’t always translate to great deals, so hunt carefully if you are set on buying a house.


No Itemized Deductions

No Itemized Deductions

In order to receive itemized deductions for your home, you typically have to have a Schedule A on your taxes. That excludes plenty of taxpayers and homeowners. Even if you can get an itemized deduction, married people tend to get the biggest rates, followed by the heads of households and then single people. However, the more interest you pay, the smaller your deduction.


High Mortgage Payments

High Mortgage Payments

As mentioned above, you’ll probably have quite a pricey mortgage payment unless you managed to buy a home mortgage-free. If you have to take out a loan to pay for a house, this could lead to debt or negatively affecting your credit score the longer you take to pay your mortgage. Even student loans and other debt can affect payment amounts.


Long Mortgages

Long Mortgages

Not only will mortgages cost a lot, but they also take a long time to pay off. Generally, it may take between 20 and 30 years to completely pay a mortgage. You can get a home mortgage deduction, but this depends on who’s currently in office as the president. Therefore, mortgage payments are subject to the shifting political climate.


Borrowing a Lot of Money

Borrowing a Lot of Money

Houses cost a lot of money, and as mentioned, you’ll probably have to take out a loan in order to afford one. People may get a bigger loan than they really need, coupled with a lower home mortgage tax deduction, according to Forbes. This overspending can potentially lead to even more debt.


More Taxes

More Taxes

Various taxes exist that you may have to pay as a homeowner. Forbes notes that these include a Medicare tax if you have at least a $250,000 exclusion as a single homeowner or a $500,000 exclusion as a wedded couple. Even if you find a good home that’s a decent investment, you may have to pay taxes like these.


Real Estate Taxes

Real Estate Taxes

You will also likely have to pay real estate taxes. These can vary based on your state’s tax rates as well as the property itself. Forbes notes that you’ll typically pay for these real estate taxes when paying for the rental of the home, but not in all circumstances.


Can't Record Losses

Can’t Record Losses

If you experience a loss when selling your home, you can’t claim it like you could with the stock market. That means that in the case of losses when moving, such as making substantially less money than anticipated on a sale, you can’t do much else but accept it.

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