Some professions are just more irritating than others. There are plenty of good reasons why people in real estate investment are obnoxious.


They Think They Can Make It Big in No Time

They Think They Can Make It Big in No Time

People who go into real estate are, on some level, expecting to make a seven-figure deal within the first year. The reality is that’s rare and deals like those take time to achieve.


They Act Like They Know Everything

They Act Like They Know Everything

Day one after their education, many of them think they are now experts. This is annoying to those who truly are experts.


They Don't Respect the Business Veterans

They Don’t Respect the Business Veterans

Because they think they know everything, some investors have a ‘thanks but no thanks’ attitude when a veteran in the business offers help. This causes them to lose good advice and a potential mentor.


They're Talking Instead of Listening

They’re Talking Instead of Listening

Real estate investors should be listening to what people want and need. Instead, they tell people what’s best for them, much to their aggravation.


They Stop Caring Once the Deal Is Finished

They Stop Caring Once the Deal Is Finished

There are investors that truly care about people. However, others vanish as soon as the ink is dry and their check is in the mail.


They Say Lower Your Standards

They Say Lower Your Standards

Obviously, if you can’t find a property you like, your standards are too high. They tell you to stop being so picky, even if your list is completely reasonable.


It's like Listening to a Used Car Salesman

It’s like Listening to a Used Car Salesman

Once they get a deal in their head, it’s all they want to talk about. It makes you feel as though you’re hearing a constant sales pitch.


They'll Encourage You to Go High

They’ll Encourage You to Go High

Real estate investors aren’t really looking out for all your best interests. Faced with the prospect of a sale being delayed or lost, they’ll encourage you not to give low offers.


They're Quick to Spend Other People's Money

They’re Quick to Spend Other People’s Money

It’s not just encouraging people to go high that makes investors annoying. They’ll urge you to put a bid in fast, even if you’re not completely sure you want the place, forgetting that it’s your money.

They Might Mislead You

An investor usually won’t outright lie because that can have legal repercussions. However, they may exaggerate how much someone else is interested in Property X to push you to make a decision faster.


They Only Care About the Result

They Only Care About the Result

An investor doesn’t get paid until a sale is complete, so it’s understandable that they want to make sales. However, because they just want a done deal, the seller could ‘win’ the cost game and the investor doesn’t always feel bad for the buyer.


They Try to Distract You With Flash

They Try to Distract You With Flash

Investors wear their finest clothes and drive the best car they can afford, and make sure you see it all. They hope that you’ll equate it with success and competence.


They Constantly Run Late

They Constantly Run Late

It may not matter to investors if they’re 10 minutes late for every meeting. However, strangers who are in a financial chess game don’t want to be left alone with their opponents.


They Use Legal Yet Sneaky Tricks

They Use Legal Yet Sneaky Tricks

Telling you someone else wants the property is tame compared to some maneuvers. Some investors will get staging experts to remove furniture temporarily to make a house seem bigger.


They Are Evasive About Costs

They Are Evasive About Costs

Of course, a real estate investor doesn’t want to scare people away. Therefore, they will be vague and talk in circles as long as possible before they bring up actual numbers.


They Don't Always Get the Facts Right

They Don’t Always Get the Facts Right

Some investors send marketing postcards congratulating you on the house you bought 3 years ago and to contact them if you want to relocate. The thing is, you didn’t use that investor and it was 5 years, not 3.